The notes from this panel probably won't make much sense to anyone since it was more of a discussion than a structured lecture. Posting these selected quotes for my own record, you marketing types probably know of many of these theories already so it might not be all that interesting.
  • Means-end chain theory and the laddering technique
    • Imagine you want the consumer / end-user to feel or think a certain way. That would be the top rung, and to get to that top rung, you need to figure out what words or other factors might trigger the user to climb the bottom rung of that ladder. Apparently skilled interviewers can deduce these patterns in language. I can't help but think of Dr. Sweets character in Bones.

  • Where you say something is more important than what you say.
    • This isn't about product placement, this is about placing your message around specific sources that elicit a certain emotion which promotes emotional contact to the brand. So let's say a beloved child character passes away on a show due to some illness. That would be a perfect time to follow up with a commercial asking for donations to save children from a similar illness because the emotions are already there, riped for picking.

  • CEO vs. CMO
    • CEO's push big changes while CMO's push incremental changes. This was quoted by a panelist who mentioned a study that produced these results. This statement stumped me since it's definitely not the case with one of my old bosses. The marketing department was always pushing for new services or products to be added since we were always the customers' champion. CEO would always play it safe and 'stay the course' striking down any new service we tried to pitch. I suppose everything we pitched were incremental improvements whereas a CEO might have the big picture handy that could lead to big bets and big gains (or losses). I guess my old CEO just wasn't a visionary.

  • Internet: People are measuring what they can right now, not what they should. SO TRUE! And how do you decide on what was a success and a failure since you can't compare it to traditional measurements?

  • Noncognitive research (most decisions made on subconscious level)
    • I can attest to this, my best ideas come while working out or brushing my teeth. So I guess I might also make my purchasing decisions then too? According to a panelist, getting in touch with unconscious mind is akin to getting in touch with humanity. 85% of decisions are made noncognitively and what people think they think is not what they think =P.

  • Set expectations / promise / delivery > meet consumer needs / efficacy!
    • Pillar 1: Competition Space
    • Pillar 2: Trademarks, positioning
    • Pillar 3: Profit pool, shares, how they move over time.

  • Companies go from vertical to distributed management every two years.

  • Closed loop multi-channel marketing: This PDF is a year old but a Google search didn't turn up much.

  • Everyone is still figuring out social media. Companies can't dive into it but they need to experiment / launch pilots in social media.

  • Analytics are an excuse when you don't know the answer. Lack of control makes better marketers get in touch with consumers more.

  • Brand management is the closest thing to owning your own business in a large corporation.

  • Elevate brands in their lives... connect! (Heard this repeatedly, make the emotional / human connection.)

  • This wasn't from the panel but for some reason I thought of something David Kelley of IDEO (and CMU alumn!) told me when I visited the d.school at Stanford. All companies value people with broad skills, those able to jump from one role to another and collaborate, but they also need deep dive experience / skill set. Something I don't think I have right now. The whole jack of all trades, master of none metaphor continues to haunt me five years after I left architecture school.

  • Marketing is science & art, one of the panelists stated this and I thought to myself so is design, architecture etc. Architecture is engineering & art (if it wasn't why did I suffer through years of statics, structures, statistics, design economics, etc.?). The architects observe people similar to marketers observing their customers. Have you ever walked up to a door and pulled on a handle when you were instead supposed to push on the door? Terrible user-interface, that handle should have never been there...